vetrerans day costs

Soldiers fill a crucial need, and often pay the ultimate price. Sometimes others pay too. My dad had been a soldier who saw huge action at Normandy and in the Pacific Islands. It changed him forever.

Going into seventh grade meant a new school, different teachers for each subject a chance to play tackle football. For all us graduated elementary school kids, they had an open house where parents and kids could come and walk the halls meet your home room teacher and learn a bit about the new experience. My home room teacher was Mr Lilly, science teacher, tall and thin with a bit of a lisp that made each sibilant “s” distinct. He looked just like the professor in old movie “The Nutty Professor” with thick black plastic framed glasses, a crew cut and plastic pocket protector full of pens in his shirt pocket.

I had never received a single grade lower than an “A” in all of elementary school and thought my dad might say that when he took us aside. I heard, “If he talks back or acts up, just punch him in the face, and when he gets home, I’ll give him worse.”

So embarrassed I wanted to disappear, Mr Lilly just replied he felt that would never be necessary. It was a different time, that was just how it was. Mr Lilly turned into a good friend, and on those few occasions when I got into trouble like any knuckle-headed seventh grader, you can bet your sweet butt I never told my dad.

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4 Comments on “vetrerans day costs”

  1. emjayzed says:

    I think my parents had the same philosophy – minus the smack in the teeth 🙂

  2. My father used to say, “I don’t care what you get on your grades, but you had better get an “A” in conduct or you’ll get it on your “A” at home from me.”

    He went on to say that he figured if you were behaving, you were listening, and if you were listening, you were learning, and that’s the best any father could expect of his son.


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